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Events

Jan
18
Thu
Bill Melega Winter Lecture Series @ Chapel Hill High School
Jan 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Esteemed educator and author BILL MELEGA continues his nine part lecture series about the Middle Ages and Gunpowder Empires with an in-depth exploration of African States & Empires from 400 AD until 1400 AD.

Jan
20
Sat
Donna Everhart – The Road to Bittersweet @ McIntyre's Books
Jan 20 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Set in the Carolinas in the 1940s, The Road to Bittersweet is a beautifully written, evocative account of a young woman reckoning not just with the unforgiving landscape, but with the rocky emotional terrain that leads from innocence to wisdom.
For fourteen-year-old Wallis Ann Stamper and her family, life in the Appalachian Mountains is simple and satisfying, though not for the tenderhearted. While her older sister, Laci — a mute, musically gifted savant — is constantly watched over and protected, Wallis Ann is as practical and sturdy as her name. When the Tuckasegee River bursts its banks, forcing them to flee in the middle of the night, those qualities save her life. But though her family is eventually reunited, the tragedy opens Wallis Ann’s eyes to a world beyond the creek that’s borne their name for generations.
Carrying what’s left of their possessions, the Stampers begin another perilous journey from their ruined home to the hill country of South Carolina. Wallis Ann’s blossoming friendship with Clayton, a high diving performer for a traveling show, sparks a new opportunity, and the family joins as a singing group. But Clayton’s attention to Laci drives a wedge between the two sisters. As jealousy and betrayal threaten to accomplish what hardship never could — divide the family for good — Wallis Ann makes a decision that will transform them all in unforeseeable ways . . .
USA Today bestselling author Donna Everhart grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina, and has lived close to her hometown for most of her life. For several years she worked for high tech companies, specializing in project management and product introduction. She carries a Bachelor of Science in Business Management. She lives in Dunn, North Carolina.

Sujata Massey – Widows of Malabar Hill @ McIntyre's Books
Jan 20 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

A Publishers Weekly Top 10 Mystery for Fall
A Library Journal Editor’s Pick for Fall 2017
Starred Booklist Review: Introducing an extraordinary female lawyer-sleuth in a new historical series set in 1920s Bombay.
Bombay, 1921: Perveen Mistry, the daughter of a respected Zoroastrian family, has just joined her father’s law firm, becoming one of the first female lawyers in India. Armed with a law degree from Oxford, Perveen also has a tragic personal history that makes her especially devoted to championing and protecting women’s legal rights. Mistry Law has been appointed to execute the will of Mr. Omar Farid, a wealthy Muslim mill owner who has left three widows behind. But as Perveen is going through the paperwork, she notices something strange: all three of the wives have signed over their full inheritance to a charity. What will they live on if they forfeit what their husband left them?
Perveen is suspicious, especially since one of the widows has signed her form with an X–meaning she probably couldn’t even read the document. The Farid widows live in full purdah — in strict seclusion, never leaving the women’s quarters or speaking to any men. Are they being taken advantage of by an unscrupulous guardian? Perveen tries to investigate, and realizes her instincts about the will were correct when tensions escalate to murder. Now it is her responsibility to figure out what really happened on Malabar Hill, and to ensure that no innocent women or children are in further danger. Inspired in part by a real woman who made history by becoming India’s first female lawyer, The Widows of Malabar Hill is a richly wrought story of multicultural 1920s Bombay as well as the debut of a sharp and promising new sleuth, Perveen Mistry.

Jan
22
Mon
The Birding Field Guide in the Digital Age, an Evolution @ Binkley Baptist Church Lounge
Jan 22 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

The field guide is one of the most indispensable tools in the birder’s toolbox, but the form has changed over the years as birders’ needs have changed. From Audubon to Peterson to Sibley to the digital realm, we’ll take a look at what works, what doesn’t, and why. Nate Swick, author of the ABA Field Guide to Birds of the Carolinas, shares some of his own experiences in creating a field guide, and what he learned about this essential item.

Jan
27
Sat
Mick Herron – This is What Happened @ McIntyre's Books
Jan 27 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

From CWA Gold Dagger winner Mick Herron comes a shocking, twisted novel of psychological suspense about one woman’s attempt to be better than ordinary.
Twenty-six-year-old Maggie Barnes is someone you would never look at twice. Living alone in a month-to-month sublet in the huge city of London, with no family but an estranged sister, no boyfriend or partner, and not much in the way of friends, Maggie is just the kind of person who could vanish from the face of the earth without anyone taking notice.
Or just the kind of person MI5 needs to infiltrate the establishment and thwart an international plot that puts all of Britain at risk.
Now one young woman has the chance to be a hero—if she can think quickly enough to stay alive.
Mick Herron was born in Newcastle and has a degree in English from Balliol College, Oxford. He is the author of ten other novels, Slow Horses, Dead Lions, Nobody Walks, Real Tigers, Spook Street, Down Cemetery Road, The Last Voice You Hear, Why We Die, Smoke and Whispers, and Reconstruction, as well as the novella The List. His work has been nominated for the Macavity, Barry, Shamus, and CWA Steel Dagger Awards, and he has won an Ellery Queen Readers Award and the CWA Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel. He lives in Oxford, England.

Feb
3
Sat
Whirlikids Bookfest @ Whirlikids Bookfest
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Join McIntyre’s Books for a special book festival featuring storytime, readings, book signings and more from elementary and middle reader authors!
10-11:30am Storytime, picture book and early elementary authors
11:30am-12:30pm Picture and early elementary author book signings in The Barn
1-3pm Middle grade author panels in The Barn
3-4pm Middle grade author book signings in The Barn
What else should you expect?
Crafts
Photobooth
Face Painting
Lots of books and fun!
Kids of all real levels, ages 3 and up are invited to this event. While you’re in the Village, enjoy lunch at The Granary or The Goat, explore the gardens and meet the farm animals in our Belted Barnyard!
Don’t forget to share your excitement on social media using #Whirlikids!
Contact the bookstore with any questions at 919.542.3030.

FEATURED AUTHORS INCLUDE
Alan Gratz, Refugee
 – Refugee is a New York Times Bestseller and was just named one of New York Times’ Best Books of the Year!
 
Sarah Mlynowski, Upside Down Magic: #4: Dragon Overnight, Whatever After Series
 
Emily Jenkins, A Greyhound A Groundhog
 
Stacy McAnulty, Earth! My First 4.54 Billion Years
 
Lauren Myracle, Dragon Overnight, Wishing Day, Flower Power and more
 
Ursula Vernon, Dragonbreath, Hamster Princess, and more
 
Karina Yan Glaser, The Vanderbeekers of 141st St.
 – The Vanderbeekers of 141st St. was just named a New York Times Notable Book of 2017!
 
Linda Ashman, Williams Winter Nap
 
Joan Holub, This Little Trailblazer
 
Camille Andros, Charlotte the Scientist Gets Squished
 
Tameka Fryer Brown, My Cold Plum Lemon Pie Bluesy Mood
 
Annette Simon, Robot Burp Head Smartypants!
 
Frances O’Roark Dowell, Sam the Man
 
Ali Standish, The Ethan I was Before
Her book just won the NC Young People’s Literature Award, and is nominated for the Carnegie Award in the UK!
 
Leah Henderson, One Shadow on the Wall
 
Eleanora Tate, Celeste’s Harlem Renaissance
 
John Claude Bemis, Out of Abaton
 
Angela Dominguez, Stella Diaz Has Something to Say
 
A special thank you to Scholastic Inc., Schwartz & Wade, HMH Books for Young Readers, Disney-Hyperion, Little Simon, Henry Holt and Co., Candlewick, Viking Books for Young Readers, Clarion Books and more for their support.

The Politics of Music in Korea @ Chapel Hill Public Library
Feb 3 @ 2:00 pm

Keith Howard, Emeritus Professor at SOAS University of London, will discuss the politics of music in Korea. The discussion is a part of the Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars series presented in partnership with the National Humanities Center and the Chapel Hill Public Library.

How do scholars become fascinated by their subjects? What is it like when they make a new discovery? How do the processes of research, analysis, writing, and teaching change their perspectives of the world?

Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars explores these questions through a series of public discussions with leading scholars from the National Humanities Center and Brooke Andrade, director of the Center’s library. These informal dialogues will highlight the personal aspects of scholarship—how scholars became interested in specific fields of study, what fuels their passion for their subjects, about the larger questions that intrigue and perplex them, and the influence their scholarship has on their ways of thinking about and living in the world.

Feb
6
Tue
Everyday Practices of Nonviolence & Nonviolent Communication for Individuals, Couples and Groups @ Chapel Hill Zen Center
Feb 6 @ 7:30 pm – 9:15 pm

Catherine Cadden and Jesse Wiens, co-authors of The Ongo Book: Everyday Nonviolence, will introduce their book and talk about how to use it for creating more peace, compassion, and wisdom in both your inner and outer world. Our time together will include experiencing some of the practices in the book, which emphasize practical applications of mindfulness, Nonviolent Communication, and more in everyday life situations. This evening will have a special focus on the integration of these practices with Zen Buddhism. Based on the authors’ work on six continents with communities, organizations, and ordinary people from all walks of life, the book offers a progression of learning that supports individuals, couples, and groups to be nonviolent in the real world.

“Using a wealth of wisdom and techniques from the many traditions they have explored, Catherine and Jesse have put together an impressively thorough and well-crafted program for spiritual development and well-being. I am frankly amazed by their daring and skill.”
– Norman Fischer, Zen priest, author of Experience: Thinking, Writing, Language and Religion and What is Zen?

“Born from a clever idea – to make long term contemplative practice doable at home – this book brims with useful advice. You will be encouraged to prioritize the values of meditative life, like compassion and clarity, in the midst of your ordinary situation. Organized to be accessible to solo practitioners, pairs or partners, and groups, the framework makes The Ongo Book practices highly adaptable.”
– Sharon Salzberg, author of Lovingkindness and Real Happiness

“In a hurried and harried world, here are some basic and potentially powerful ideas about how to remain stable and unrocked. My guess is they will become more valuable as our various external crises deepen, and some of the distractions on which we currently lean begin to show their shallowness.”
– Bill McKibben, author of Deep Economy and co-founder of 350.org

“I once asked Marshall Rosenberg what it would take for me to ‘really learn this stuff.’ His answer: ‘Practice, practice, practice’” My Companion Workbook was written to offer practice in learning the NVC model, and now Jesse and Catherine take us further and deeper, providing practices to really get it in our bones, from the inside out. I highly recommend The Ongo Book as a way to take Marshall’s suggestion to heart!”
– Lucy Leu, author of Nonviolent Communication Companion Workbook and co-founder of the Freedom Project

Feb
10
Sat
Ansley Herring Wegner – This Day in NC History @ McIntyre's Books
Feb 10 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Matching up history with the calendar, Ansley Wegner shares with readers a day-by-day chronicle highlighting topics of importance to North Carolina history, from sensational crimes to top-selling records to homegrown businesses. This keepsake illustrated volume, fun and informative for all ages, had its genesis as a blog, issued daily for four years on the web and on broadcast outlets.
Ansley Herring Wegner, a native of Wilson, has worked in the North Carolina Office of Archives and History since 1994 and has been the administrator of the Highway Historical Marker Program since 2014. She is the author of History for All the People: One Hundred Years of Public History in North Carolina and Phantom Pain: North Carolina’s Artificial-Limbs Program for Confederate Veterans.

Special Storytime with Ladybug Girl @ McIntyre's Books
Feb 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Meet beloved book character Ladybug Girl and share stories of love and friendship at this special story time event at McIntyre’s. The Ladybug Girl series showcases the themes of imagination, empowerment, compromise and courage — not to mention a love of the outdoors.
Enjoy fun crafts and treats as we celebrate Valentine’s Day. Dress up encouraged!
Contact the bookstore with any questions at 919.542.3030.

About Sarah Carr, Children’s Book Buyer
With 30 years of experience selling books, including being a longtime employee at McIntyre’s, Sarah was an obvious choice to take over the role of Children’s Book Buyer. If you need assistance with selections for children, she is your go-to source. Sarah lives in Pittsboro with her husband and two sons.

Special Storytime with Ladybug Girl @ McIntyre's Books
Feb 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Meet beloved book character Ladybug Girl and share stories of love and friendship at this special story time event at McIntyre’s. The Ladybug Girl series showcases the themes of imagination, empowerment, compromise and courage — not to mention a love of the outdoors.
Enjoy fun crafts and treats as we celebrate Valentine’s Day. Dress up encouraged!
Contact the bookstore with any questions at 919.542.3030.

About Sarah Carr, Children’s Book Buyer
With 30 years of experience selling books, including being a longtime employee at McIntyre’s, Sarah was an obvious choice to take over the role of Children’s Book Buyer. If you need assistance with selections for children, she is your go-to source. Sarah lives in Pittsboro with her husband and two sons.

Feb
17
Sat
CANCELLED: Health, Gender, and Nation-Building in Latin America @ Chapel Hill Public Library
Feb 17 @ 2:00 pm

**This event has been cancelled.**

José Amador, associate professor of global and intercultural studies (Latin American, Latino/a, and Caribbean Studies) at Miami University, will discuss health and gender in Latin America.

How do scholars become fascinated by their subjects? What is it like when they make a new discovery? How do the processes of research, analysis, writing, and teaching change their perspectives of the world?

Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars explores these questions through a series of public discussions with leading scholars from the National Humanities Center and Brooke Andrade, director of the Center’s library. These informal dialogues will highlight the personal aspects of scholarship—how scholars became interested in specific fields of study, what fuels their passion for their subjects, about the larger questions that intrigue and perplex them, and the influence their scholarship has on their ways of thinking about and living in the world.

Feb
24
Sat
Understanding Modern Slavery @ Chapel Hill Public Library
Feb 24 @ 2:00 pm

Laura Murphy, associate professor of English literature at Loyola University New Orleans, will discuss modern slavery.

The discussion is a part of the Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars series presented in partnership with the National Humanities Center and the Chapel Hill Public Library.

How do scholars become fascinated by their subjects? What is it like when they make a new discovery? How do the processes of research, analysis, writing, and teaching change their perspectives of the world?

Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars explores these questions through a series of public discussions with leading scholars from the National Humanities Center and Brooke Andrade, director of the Center’s library. These informal dialogues will highlight the personal aspects of scholarship—how scholars became interested in specific fields of study, what fuels their passion for their subjects, about the larger questions that intrigue and perplex them, and the influence their scholarship has on their ways of thinking about and living in the world.

Feb
26
Mon
Pathways for Food Business: Restaurateurs, Bakers, Caterers, Food Truck Owners, Etc. @ Durham Tech's Orange County Campus
Feb 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Entrepreneurs by nature think “outside the box”. Come and explore the many paths that a food business idea might take. How can your particular skills and resources, and the needs of your community, translate into unique, viable and profitable options? Taught by Dani Black, Bigger Tables Culinary and Service Consulting.

Mar
3
Sat
Women, Violence, and Culture in Contemporary India @ Chapel Hill Public Library
Mar 3 @ 2:00 pm

Harleen Singh, associate professor of literature and women’s, gender and sexuality studies at Brandeis University, will discuss women, violence, and culture in contemporary India.

The discussion is a part of the Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars series presented in partnership with the National Humanities Center and the Chapel Hill Public Library.

How do scholars become fascinated by their subjects? What is it like when they make a new discovery? How do the processes of research, analysis, writing, and teaching change their perspectives of the world?

Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars explores these questions through a series of public discussions with leading scholars from the National Humanities Center and Brooke Andrade, director of the Center’s library. These informal dialogues will highlight the personal aspects of scholarship—how scholars became interested in specific fields of study, what fuels their passion for their subjects, about the larger questions that intrigue and perplex them, and the influence their scholarship has on their ways of thinking about and living in the world.

Mar
5
Mon
How to Start a Business @ Durham Tech's Orange County Campus
Mar 5 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

This seminar provides information including, but not limited to, getting ready to start a business, feasibility of idea, business planning, business modeling, governmental requirements, and available resources. This session is the perfect place to bring all your startup questions. Taught by LaShon Harley, Durham Tech’s Small Business Center.

Mar
6
Tue
Minrose Gwin “Promise” Author Event @ Flyleaf Books @ Flyleaf Books
Mar 6 @ 6:00 pm

MINROSE GWIN, like the characters in her latest novel, Promise, grew up in Tupelo, Mississippi. She began her writing career as a newspaper and wire service reporter in cities throughout the southeast. Her civil rights-era novel, The Queen of Palmyra, was a “Indy Notable Selection” and a finalist for the John Gardner Fiction Book Award. Her memoir, Wishing for Snow, tells the story of her mother’s descent into mental illness.

Wearing another hat, Minrose is also the author of cultural and literary studies books that focus on racial injustice. In Remembering Medgar Evers: Writing the Long Civil Rights Movement, she writes of the reverberating impact of the Civil Rights leader’s martyrdom. She is also a co-editor of The Literature of the American South and has taught as a professor at universities across the country, most recently the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

PROMISE is a literary love song that hits all the right notes and has recently been selected as both an Indie Next Pick and SIBA OKRA Pick. Poignant and insightful, it’s a powerful story of loss, hope, despair, grit, and courage. With this book, Gwin flexes her impressive narrative muscle creating her most ambitious novel to date. With her sharp examination of race relations, disaster aid relief and more, she’s crafted a searing cultural commentary on today’s most prescient issues focused through the lens of history. It’s effortless to see recent headlines reflected in the novel: Puerto Rican hurricane relief, Black Lives Matter, Charlottesville, NFL protests, and on the list goes. A breathtakingly gorgeous account of an unknown side of history, PROMISE is an enthralling saga that is affecting, shocking, and ultimately redemptive.

Mar
7
Wed
FailFest @ The Maywood
Mar 7 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Join us for a one-of-a-kind storytelling event with Triangle nonprofit leaders. Failfest is an annual open-mic style event where attendees share their stories of failure with a dash of humor and fun.

The event, organized and sponsored by Triangle Community Foundation, BC/DC Ideas, and Third Space Studio, intends to rethink the way society views failure, celebrating it as a learning experience instead of a dead end.

“Everyone fails; FailFest is about redefining what it means to fail and proving that it is a learning experience that can lead to great success,” says Meg Buckingham, Triangle Community Foundation. “We’re excited to bring this amazing group together for a night of laughter, learning and celebrating those epic fails.”

FailFest will feature five “star failures” who have experienced significant obstacles in their careers, but now stand as influential leaders in the Triangle’s nonprofit community. The host speakers include: Tina Bailey, Grant Administrator at Triangle Community Foundation; Stephen Graddick, Storyteller; Marie Hopper, Executive Director of FIRST North Carolina; Tami Schwerin, Executive Director of Abundance NC; and Hector Salgado, Executive Director of Alliance of AIDS Services.

For more information or to register for FailFest visit http://bit.ly/2ELXlTA. The first 50 attendees will receive a free beer!

Mar
11
Sun
Sorcery, Celebration, and Religious Life in Rural Cuba @ Chapel Hill Public Library
Mar 11 @ 2:00 pm

Todd Ochoa, associate professor of religious studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will discuss religious practices in Cuba.

The discussion is a part of the Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars series presented in partnership with the National Humanities Center and the Chapel Hill Public Library.

How do scholars become fascinated by their subjects? What is it like when they make a new discovery? How do the processes of research, analysis, writing, and teaching change their perspectives of the world?

Discovery and Inspiration: Conversations with Scholars explores these questions through a series of public discussions with leading scholars from the National Humanities Center and Brooke Andrade, director of the Center’s library. These informal dialogues will highlight the personal aspects of scholarship—how scholars became interested in specific fields of study, what fuels their passion for their subjects, about the larger questions that intrigue and perplex them, and the influence their scholarship has on their ways of thinking about and living in the world.

Nancy Peacock, Reading and Reception @ Hillsborough Gallery of Arts
Mar 11 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

North Carolina author and 2018 Piedmont Laureate, Nancy Peacock, reads from her book “A Broom of One’s Own.” The reading caps the gallery’s annual show “It’s All About The Story” which features work inspired by the characters and events in Ms. Peacock’s book. The reading and reception will be held on Sunday, March 11th from 4-6pm at the Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, 121 N. Churton St. in Hillsborough. The event is free and open to the public. For more information call the gallery at 919-732-5001.