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Sep
16
Sat
Craig Johnson – The Western Star @ McIntyre's Books
Sep 16 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

This is the thirteenth novel in Craig Johnson’s beloved New York Times bestselling ‘Longmire’ series, the basis for the hit Netflix series ‘Longmire.’

Sheriff Walt Longmire is enjoying a celebratory beer after a weapons certification at the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy when a younger sheriff confronts him with a photograph of twenty-five armed men standing in front of a Challenger steam locomotive. It takes him back to when, fresh from the battlefields of Vietnam, then-deputy Walt accompanied his mentor Lucian to the annual Wyoming Sheriff’s Association junket held on the excursion train known as the Western Star, which ran the length of Wyoming from Cheyenne to Evanston and back. Armed with his trusty Colt .45 and a paperback of Agatha Christie’s ‘Murder on the Orient Express’, the young Walt was ill-prepared for the machinations of twenty-four veteran sheriffs, let alone the cavalcade of curious characters that accompanied them.

The photograph—along with an upcoming parole hearing for one of the most dangerous men Walt has encountered in a lifetime of law enforcement—hurtles the sheriff into a head-on collision of past and present, placing him and everyone he cares about squarely on the tracks of runaway revenge.

Craig Johnson is the recipient of the Western Writers of America Spur Award for fiction, the Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award for fiction, the Nouvel Observateur Prix du Roman Noir and the Prix SNCF du Polar. His novella ‘Spirit of Steamboat’ was the first One Book Wyoming selection. He lives in Ucross, Wyoming, a town with a population of 25.

Thomas Mullen – Lightning Men @ McIntyre's Books
Sep 16 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

“Writes with a ferocious passion that’ll knock the wind out of you.” — The New York Times, on ‘Darktown.’

“Reads like the best of James Ellroy.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review), on ‘Darktown.’

“Mullen is a wonderful architect of intersecting plotlines and unexpected answers.” — The Washington Post, on ‘Darktown.’

From the acclaimed author of ‘The Last Town on Earth’ comes the gripping follow-up to ‘Darktown’, a “combustible procedural that will knock the wind out of you” — The New York Times.

Officer Denny Rakestraw, “negro officers” Lucius Boggs and Tommy Smith and Sergeant McInnis have their hands full in an overcrowded and rapidly changing Atlanta. It’s 1950, and color lines are shifting and racial tensions are simmering. Black families-including Smith’s sister and brother-in-law-are moving into Rake’s formerly all-white neighborhood, leading some residents to raise money to buy them out while others advocate a more violent solution. Rake’s brother-in-law, Dale, a proud Klansman, launches a scheme to rally his fellow Kluxers to save their neighborhood. When those efforts spiral out of control and leave a man dead, Rake is forced to choose between loyalty to family or the law.
He isn’t the only one with family troubles. Boggs has outraged his preacher father by courting a domestic, and now her ex-boyfriend has been released from prison. As Boggs, Smith and their all-black precinct contend with violent drug dealers fighting for turf in new territory, their personal dramas draw them closer to the fires that threaten to consume Atlanta once again.

With echoes of James Ellroy and Denis Lehane, Mullen demonstrates in ‘Lightning Men’ why he’s celebrated for writing crime fiction “with a nimble sense of history…quick on its feet and vividly drawn” — Dallas Morning News.

Thomas Mullen is the author of ‘Darktown’ and ‘The Last Town on Earth’ which was named Best Debut Novel of 2006 by USA Today and was awarded the James Fenimore Cooper Prize for excellence in historical fiction, ‘The Many Deaths of the Firefly Brothers’ and ‘The Revisionists’. His works have been named to year’s best lists by the Chicago Tribune, USA Today, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the A.V. Club, The San Diego Union-Times, Paste, Cleveland’s Plain-Dealer and Amazon. His stories and essays have been published in Grantland, Paste and The Huffington Post, and his Atlanta Magazine true crime story about a novelist/con man won the City and Regional Magazine Award for best feature. He lives in Atlanta with his wife and sons.

Sarah Mlynowski – Abby in Wonderland @ McIntyre's Books
Sep 16 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

We are delighted to welcome beloved author Sarah Mlynowski to McIntyre’s!
In this extra-magical installment of the beloved series, follow Abby down the rabbit hole into Wonderland! Together with her three friends, she will encounter talking rabbits, mad hatters, caterpillars, Cheshire cats, and mean queens, and attend an unforgettable tea party. But if she can’t solve a curious riddle in time, Abby could be stuck in Alice’s story for good! This Special Edition is extra-long and contains bonus content that fans will adore!
Sarah is the author of both the Whatever After and Magic in Manhattan series, as well as Don’t Even Think About It, Milkrun, Fishbowl, As Seen on TV, Monkey Business, Gimme a Call, Ten Things We Did (And Probably Shouldn’t Have) and How to Be Bad (along with E.Lockhart and Lauren Myracle). Sarah has written short stories and novellas as well as co-edited the bestselling chick-lit collections Girls’ Night In and Girls’ Night Out and co-wrote the first ever guide to writing chick lit, See Jane Write.
Sarah’s books have been translated into twenty-one languages and optioned to Hollywood. She was born in Montreal but now lives and writes in New York City.

Sep
17
Sun
Karen Pullen – Restless Dreams @ McIntyre's Books
Sep 17 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The characters in the 18 stories that comprise Restless Dreams, a collection of short stories, share a certain resemblance: tired eyes, a slow trudging step, and the distracted air of someone with lots on her mind, some of it unspeakable. But despite sore feet and an aching heart, each yearns for better days, aims for what is right, and makes it all work somehow. She’s a cop, a mom, a saleswoman, nanny, teacher, hairdresser, teen. None have it easy, but they don’t give up their restless dreams of a more perfect life.
Karen Pullen’s restless dreams were achieved when she escaped the cubicle and took up fiction writing. After earning an MFA from Stonecoast at the University of Southern Maine, she published two traditional mystery novels, Cold Feet and Cold Heart, and numerous short stories. Karen serves on the national board of Sisters in Crime, and works as an innkeeper, editor, and teacher of writing. She lives in Pittsboro, North Carolina, and blogs occasionally on her website.

Sep
23
Sat
Joseph Wheelan – Midnight in the Pacific @ McIntyre's Books
Sep 23 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

In August 1942, U.S. Marines landed on the remote South Pacific island of Guadalcanal, and America’s first campaign of World War II began.
From afar, Guadalcanal resembled a tropical paradise. In actuality, it was infinite misery: steamy jungles, swarming malarial mosquitoes, downpours, mud, and Japanese soldiers pledged to fight to the death in the Bushido tradition.
Initially a simple mission to seize Japanese air bases in the southern Solomon Islands, the campaign mushroomed into an all-in battle waged on air, land, and sea. Both sides rushed planes, ships, and men to the sprawling battleground.
For months, the outcome of the desperate struggle with Japanese land, sea, and air forces was in doubt. When the fighting ended, however, Guadalcanal had become a byword for American grit. It was there that Japanese expansion was stopped for the first time — the turning point of the Pacific war.
Joseph Wheelan was a reporter and editor for The Associated Press for 24 years in Cheyenne, Wyoming; Denver; Little Rock; and Raleigh, N.C. While news editor in the AP’s Denver and Raleigh bureaus, Wheelan directed team, feature and investigative reporting projects while supervising daily news coverage. He also reviewed books for the AP and, among other things, wrote about the Korean War and the continuing battle by its veterans to obtain government benefits for cold-weather injuries.

Sep
30
Sat
Bren McClain – One Good Mama Bone @ McIntyre's Books
Sep 30 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Set in early 1950s rural South Carolina, One Good Mama Bone chronicles Sarah Creamer’s quest to find her “mama bone,” after she is left to care for a boy who is not her own but instead is the product of an affair between her husband and her best friend and neighbor, a woman she calls “Sister.” When her husband drinks himself to death, Sarah, a dirt-poor homemaker with no family to rely on and the note on the farm long past due, must find a way for her and young Emerson Bridge to survive. But the more daunting obstacle is Sarah’s fear that her mother’s words, seared in her memory since she first heard them at the age of six, were a prophesy, “You ain’t got you one good mama bone in you, girl.”
When Sarah reads in the local newspaper that a boy won $680 with his Grand Champion steer at the recent 1951 Fat Cattle Show & Sale, she sees this as their financial salvation and finds a way to get Emerson Bridge a steer from a local farmer to compete in the 1952 show. But the young calf is unsettled at Sarah’s farm, crying out in distress and growing louder as the night wears on. Some four miles away, the steer’s mother hears his cries and breaks out of a barbed-wire fence to go in search of him. The next morning Sarah finds the young steer quiet, content, and nursing a large cow. Inspired by the mother cow’s act of love, Sarah names her Mama Red. And so Sarah’s education in motherhood begins with Mama Red as her teacher.
But Luther Dobbins, the man who sold Sarah the steer, has his sights set on winning too, and, like Sarah, he is desperate, but not for money. Dobbins is desperate for glory, wanting to regain his lost grand-champion dynasty, and he will stop at nothing to win. Emboldened by her lessons from Mama Red and her budding mama bone, Sarah is committed to victory even after she learns the winning steer’s ultimate fate. Will she stop at nothing, even if it means betraying her teacher?
McClain’s writing is distinguished by a sophisticated and detailed portrayal of the day-to-day realities of rural poverty and an authentic sense of time and place that marks the best southern fiction. Her characters transcend their archetypes and her animal-as-teacher theme recalls the likes of Water for Elephants and The Art of Racing in the Rain. One Good Mama Bone explores the strengths and limitations of parental love, the healing power of the human-animal bond, and the ethical dilemmas of raising animals for food.

Oct
7
Sat
Denise Kiernan – The Last Castle @ McIntyre's Books
Oct 7 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

From the author of the New York Times bestseller The Girls of Atomic City comes the fascinating true story behind the magnificent Gilded Age mansion Biltmore—the largest, grandest residence ever built in the United States.
Orphaned at a young age, Edith Stuyvesant Dresser claimed lineage from one of New York’s best known families. She grew up in Newport and Paris, and her engagement and marriage to George Vanderbilt was one of the most watched events of Gilded Age society. But none of this prepared her to be mistress of Biltmore House.
Before their marriage, the wealthy and bookish Vanderbilt had dedicated his life to creating a spectacular European-style estate on 125,000 acres of North Carolina wilderness. He summoned the famous landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted to tame the grounds, collaborated with celebrated architect Richard Morris Hunt to build a 175,000-square-foot chateau, filled it with priceless art and antiques, and erected a charming village beyond the gates. Newlywed Edith was now mistress of an estate nearly three times the size of Washington, DC and benefactress of the village and surrounding rural area. When fortunes shifted and changing times threatened her family, her home, and her community, it was up to Edith to save Biltmore—and secure the future of the region and her husband’s legacy.
The story of Biltmore spans World Wars, the Jazz Age, the Depression, and generations of the famous Vanderbilt family, and features a captivating cast of real-life characters including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, Teddy Roosevelt, John Singer Sargent, James Whistler, Henry James, and Edith Wharton. The Last Castle is the unique American story of how the largest house in America flourished, faltered, and ultimately endured to this day.

Oct
8
Sun
James Benn – The Devouring: A Billy Boyle Novel @ McIntyre's Books
Oct 8 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

A murder in wartime Switzerland reveals Swiss complicity with the Nazis and profiteering during World War II.
Billy and Kaz are sent to neutral Switzerland to investigate the murder of a Swiss banking official with ties to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). The US and Swiss governments are about to embark on diplomatic discussions regarding the Safehaven Protocols, which are aimed at limiting the amount of war materials exported by Switzerland to the Nazis, halting the laundering of looted gold, and preventing the postwar use of Nazi wealth for war criminals. With the talks about to begin, the OSS wants their involvement in the murder cleared up, as well as to protect the participants from any threat of violence.
The plans go wrong from the beginning when Billy and Kaz crash-land in France. As they make their way through occupied territory to the border, they meet Anton Lasho, a member of the Sinti ethnic group, whose family was slaughtered by the Nazis, and who is, in turn, a one-man Nazi-killing machine. They’ll need his help, because as they find once they make it across the border, Swiss banks are openly laundering gold ‘harvested’ from concentration camps, and those that are profiting will do everything they can to protect their wealth and hide their dark secrets.
James R. Benn is the author of the Billy Boyle World War II mystery series. He has been a librarian for many years. He lives in Hadlyme, Connecticut.

Oct
14
Sat
Diane Chamberlain – The Stolen Marriage @ McIntyre's Books
Oct 14 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

In 1944, 23-year-old Tess DeMello abruptly ends her engagement to the love of her life when she marries a mysterious stranger and moves to Hickory, North Carolina, a small town struggling with racial tension and the hardships imposed by World War II. Tess’s new husband, Henry Kraft, is a secretive man who often stays out all night, hides money from his new wife and shows no interest in making love. Tess quickly realizes she’s trapped in a strange and loveless marriage with no way out.

The people of Hickory love and respect Henry and see Tess as an outsider, treating her with suspicion and disdain, especially after one of the town’s prominent citizens dies in a terrible accident and Tess is blamed. Tess suspects people are talking about her, plotting behind her back, and following her as she walks around town. What does everyone know about Henry that she does not? Feeling alone and adrift, Tess turns to the one person who seems to understand her, a local medium who gives her hope but seems to know more than he’s letting on.

When a sudden polio epidemic strikes the town, the townspeople band together to build a polio hospital. Tess, who has a nursing degree, bucks Henry’s wishes and begins to work at the hospital, finding meaning in nursing the young victims. Yet at home, Henry’s actions grow more alarming by the day. As Tess works to save the lives of her patients, can she untangle her husband’s mysterious behavior and save her own life?

Diane Chamberlain is the international bestselling author of 24 novels published in more than eleven languages. She lives in North Carolina with her partner, photographer John Pagliuca, and her shelties, Keeper and Cole.

Oct
19
Thu
Author Event: Christina Baker Kline @ 21c Museum Hotel
Oct 19 @ 7:00 pm

Join Durham Literacy Center for a special event featuring #1 New York Times bestselling author, Christina Baker Kline, on October 19th, 2017. Christina will talk about her bestselling book, Orphan Train, copies of which will be available for purchase at the event. Christina will discuss the true story of the 250,000 orphaned and abandoned children sent on trains from the East Coast to the Midwest as indentured servants — and how she stumbled on this hidden piece of American history.

Preceding the author talk, there will be a short performance by The Pitchforks, the oldest a cappella group at Duke University.

EVENT TICKETS & SPONSORSHIPS:

– Regular tickets for the 7:00 p.m. speaking event cost $30 each

– VIP tickets for the 5:30 p.m. private reception with Christina Baker Kline cost $100 each and include a signed, personalized copy of Orphan Train in The Vault at 21c

– Sponsorship opportunities are also available via Durham Literacy’s website. Call or e-mail to inquire.

Oct
21
Sat
Wiley Cash – The Last Ballad @ McIntyre's Books
Oct 21 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

The New York Times bestselling author of the celebrated A Land More Kind Than Home and This Dark Road to Mercy returns with this eagerly awaited new novel, set in the Appalachian foothills of North Carolina in 1929 and inspired by actual events. The chronicle of an ordinary woman’s struggle for dignity and her rights in a textile mill, The Last Ballad is a moving tale of courage in the face of oppression and injustice, with the emotional power of Ron Rash’s Serena, Dennis Lehane’s The Given Day, and the unforgettable films Norma Rae and Silkwood.
Twelve times a week, twenty-eight-year-old Ella May Wiggins makes the two-mile trek to and from her job on the night shift at American Mill No. 2 in Bessemer City, North Carolina. The insular community considers the mill’s owners—the newly arrived Goldberg brothers—white but not American and expects them to pay Ella May and other workers less because they toil alongside African Americans like Violet, Ella May’s best friend. While the dirty, hazardous job at the mill earns Ella May a paltry nine dollars for seventy-two hours of work each week, it’s the only opportunity she has. Her no-good husband, John, has run off again, and she must keep her four young children alive with whatever work she can find.
When the union leaflets begin circulating, Ella May has a taste of hope, a yearning for the better life the organizers promise. But the mill owners, backed by other nefarious forces, claim the union is nothing but a front for the Bolshevik menace sweeping across Europe. To maintain their control, the owners will use every means in their power, including bloodshed, to prevent workers from banding together. On the night of the county’s biggest rally, Ella May, weighing the costs of her choice, makes up her mind to join the movement—a decision that will have lasting consequences for her children, her friends, her town—indeed all that she loves.
Seventy-five years later, Ella May’s daughter Lilly, now an elderly woman, tells her nephew about his grandmother and the events that transformed their family. Illuminating the most painful corners of their history, she reveals, for the first time, the tragedy that befell Ella May after that fateful union meeting in 1929.
Intertwining myriad voices, Wiley Cash brings to life the heartbreak and bravery of the now forgotten struggle of the labor movement in early twentieth-century America—and pays tribute to the thousands of heroic women and men who risked their lives to win basic rights for all workers. Lyrical, heartbreaking, and haunting, this eloquent novel confirms Wiley Cash’s place among our nation’s finest writers.
Wiley Cash is an award-winning and native of North Carolina. He has held residency positions at Yaddo and The MacDowell Colony and teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Southern New Hampshire University. He lives in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Nov
17
Fri
Nancy Pearl – George & Lizzie @ McIntyre's Books
Nov 17 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

From “America’s librarian” and NPR books commentator Nancy Pearl comes an emotionally riveting debut novel about an unlikely marriage at a crossroads.
George and Lizzie have radically different understandings of what love and marriage should be. George grew up in a warm and loving family — his father an orthodontist, his mother a stay-at-home mom — while Lizzie grew up as the only child of two famous psychologists, who viewed her more as an in-house experiment than a child to love.
Over the course of their marriage, nothing has changed — George is happy; Lizzie remains . . . unfulfilled. When a shameful secret from Lizzie’s past resurfaces, she’ll need to face her fears in order to accept the true nature of the relationship she and George have built over a decade together.
With pitch-perfect prose and compassion and humor to spare, George and Lizzie is an intimate story of new and past loves, the scars of childhood, and an imperfect marriage at its defining moments.
Nancy Pearl is known as “America’s Librarian.” She speaks about the pleasures of reading at library conferences, to literacy organizations and community groups throughout the world and comments on books regularly on KUOW FM in Seattle, as well as KWGS in Tulsa, Oklahoma and Wisconsin Public Radio. Born and raised in Detroit, she received her master’s degree in library science in 1967 from the University of Michigan. She also received an MA in history from Oklahoma State University in 1977. Among her many honors and awards are the 2011 Librarian of the Year Award from Library Journal; and the 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association. She also hosts a monthly television show, Book Lust with Nancy Pearl. She lives in Seattle.